WINNEBAGO-BOONE FARM BUREAU

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Mission Statement

Be the voice, resource, and advocate for farm families and agriculture,
while promoting stewardship for today and future generations.




Grain Bin Safety/Rescue Course- Saturday, July 26th
The Winnebago-Boone Young Leaders is hosting a three-hour Grain Bin Safety/Rescue course for farm families on Saturday, July 26th from
10 a.m. - 2 p.m. (lunch included) at the Farm Bureau building located at 1925 S Meridian Road, Rockford, IL.  The course will be taught by Stateline Farm Rescue which was founded to fulfill the need for farm and agricultural rescue training in the Upper Midwest, and is based in the Wisconsin-Illinois stateline area. Each member of their highly-trained instructor team has many years of fire and rescue experience, and each is currently active in fire service. In addition, these instructors have all either worked on or owned their own farm operation; and each has excellent working knowledge of modern farm equipment, along with the hazards involved with dangerous farm occupations.

The Stateline Farm Rescue Grain Bin Safety/Rescue course is designed to give you knowledge of grain bin design and structure, as well as the dangers involved in working with and around these structures.  Grain handling equipment and grain movement are also covered. Hands-on training utilizing their custom-built grain bin entrapment simulator will follow the classroom portion of the course.

This is a free course; however, seats are limited.  To reserve your seats, please contact the office at 815-962-0653.


Defensive Driving Course- October 21-22, 2014
The Winnebago-Boone Farm Bureau is sponsoring a Defensive Driving course on October 21st and 22nd.  The class will be held at the Winnebago-Boone Farm Bureau Building located at 1925 S Meridian Road, Rockford, IL.  The course is open to any Farm Bureau member, especially those members that are 55 years and older and COUNTRY Financial insured.

Classes start at 10 a.m. and will conclude at approximately 3 p.m. each day.  The registration fee is $18.00 per person which covers the cost of the course materials and the presenter.  The Winnebago-Boone Farm Bureau will provide a free lunch on both days.

Those completing the course are eligible to receive a discount on their auto insurance, but they must attend both days to qualify for the discount.  An examination is NOT required to complete the course or receive certification. 

Advanced reservations are required and the class size is limited to 25 people.  Act now to take advantage of this cost-saving traffic safety program.  Call the Farm Bureau office at 815-962-0653 to make a reservation or for more information.  Reservations will be taken on a first come, first serve basis.  Registration fee is due by October 13th.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farm Bureau Member Honored with the 2014 Pork Promoter of the Year Award

Carrie Pollard of Rockford, Ill. was recognized by the Illinois Pork Producers Association (IPPA) as the 2014 Pork Promoter of the Year Award winner at the IL Pork Expo in Peoria.

This award recognizes an individual, couple, or family who has done an outstanding job promoting pork and/or the pork industry on a local, regional, or state level.

“Carrie has been instrumental to the success of many IPPA activities and has freely given of her time and assisted in whatever way possible to further promote the pork industry to consumers.” said Todd Dail, a pork producer from Erie, Ill. and current IPPA President.

Growing up on a 200-sow, farrow-to-finish operation in western Illinois, instilled a deep passion for Carrie for the pork industry. While she doesn’t currently have her own pigs, she is an active participant in the swine industry, helping to improve the consumer perception of pork, so that there is still a vibrant pork industry when she does have her own barns. 

 In the meantime, Carrie serves as Technical Services Manager for Bethany Animal Hospital in Sycamore.  There she puts her M.S. & B.S. degrees from the University of Illinois to work, managing the environmental compliance and building construction for the clinic’s managed farms; while also working on wean to finish consultation and data analysis. 

Carrie is a former board member of the DeKalb Area Pork Producers and served as an active Board Member of the Illinois Pork Producers Association for three years. She served as the District 1 representative. During her time on the board, Carrie was always one of the board members that showed up to help at numerous activities.  

Carrie was active on a variety of IPPA committees including the education/youth and marketing committee. She volunteered at many events including the White Sox tailgate and numerous grocery store demos. Carrie volunteered back to back weekends this past August for a special promotion with Dominicks stores and the Illinois Farm Families. She handed out samples and talked to shoppers about pork and pork production issues.

Her involvement on the IPPA Board began because Carrie wanted to give back to an organization that she has been involved with since she was young. She wanted to work with all different size operations and varied producer viewpoints to help develop policies to benefit the pork industry.

Carrie is an extremely active Operation Main Street (OMS) speaker, having scheduled more than 100 presentations throughout northern Illinois, spending a great deal of time in the Chicago suburbs educating consumers on where their pork comes from. Her efforts help reach into an area of the state where people the industry really needs to reach are located.  Carrie works to be proactive in making sure consumers are educated about pork production.  She always leaves these presentations feeling re-energized about helping to improve the pork industry image.

Both Carrie, and her husband, Brent, have been active in the Illinois Farm Bureau Young Leaders and Illinois Farm Families efforts.

Brent & Carrie recently took over full ownership of the family’s 100 cow dairy in Rockford in 2014, so they stay quite busy on the home farm.  They are members of First Presbyterian Church in Winnebago and have a 1 year old daughter, Ainsley. 

“Telling the pork producer story has been a mission of Carrie’s the last several years,” said Dail. “Carrie has gone above and beyond in her support of the pork industry in Illinois. Her time and efforts have been a true blessing to the IPPA organization and the pork industry.”








ASK A FARMER!


Do you have questions about agriculture and wish to know the answer?  Here is your chance! 

Q: When a farmer does crop dusting, does he do it or does his brother/hired guy?
A: The Farmer generally hires an outside source or company to spray (crop dusting) for them due to requirements for licenses, insurance and experience.- Cody

Q: What percentage of crops grown and sold in Boone County are organic? GMOs and non-GMOs?
A: "Short answer is no one knows... The most recent USDA Ag Census data lists Boone county as having 137,000 acres in farmland in 2007.  While it may look like it, not all acres are corn and soybean fields.  Of the acres planted in 2007, 59% were planted to field corn, 24% to soybeans, 3.5% to alfalfa and other forage (mainly used to feed cows, horses, and other ruminants), and 2% to wheat.  The remaining acres are a diverse mix such as nursery trees, fruits, vegetables, and pasture for animals.  


Seed that has been developed with a genetically modified organism (GMO) is most often found in corn and soybean seed varieties.  Farmers do not have any wheat GMO seed varieties that they can buy.  Most of the fruit and vegetable production is produced for local food markets and is mainly organic and non-GMO. 

So that leaves corn and soybeans.  I have grown both GMO and non-GMO varieties.  What I plant depends on; seed variety yield, the weeds and insects that I find in my fields, and market prices.  I sell my grain to two local elevators.  One contracts directly with farmers to raise specific varieties of corn and soybeans depending on what a buyer such as a food processor wants.  The grain buyer at that elevator estimated about 90% of the soybean seed varieties grown in the local area are GMO and 80% of the corn.  

Working through the math, a good estimate would be about 70% of the farm land acres in Boone County are grown using a GMO seed variety."- Ken

Q: Why do honeybees make honey?
A: Honey bees make honey to feed the hive and store enough to get through the winter.  If there is extra, that is what the beekeeper. -Phillip

Q: What starts their (honey bees) honeycomb?
A: When honey bees eat nectar and honey, they secrete wax on their abdomen (same as people grow hair).  They use this wax to build the honeycomb.  TRIVIA: 1 pound of honeycomb will support 24 pounds of honey. -Phillip






Agricultural Security & Terrorism Awareness


In January 2013, the Winnebago Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in partnership with Win-Bur-Sew Fire Department hosted an information meeting on “Agricultural Security & Terrorism”.  The presentation was given by Steffan Nass, Weapons of Mass Destruction Coordinator- FBI’s Springfield Division. 

Agro-Terrorism is defined as the deliberate introduction, use, or threatened use, of a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive agent against one or more components of the food or agriculture sectors, with the goal of causing mortality or morbidity, generating fee, precipitating economic loss, or undermining sector stability and confidence in government.

Here are a few indicators of Agro-Terrorism.

  • Suspicious persons asking specific questions about a facility or process.
  • Unauthorized photography of processes in or around facilities or farms.
  • Possessions of chemicals, biological agents, vaccines, or medication with no apparent purpose
  • Manuals, communications, or websites pertaining to chemicals or biological agents
  • Attempts to rent or borrow ag-related equipment for no logical reason or purpose
  • Thefts of anhydrous ammonia or other fertilizer products
  • Thefts of livestock

 Agricultural Retail Facilities should report any of the following:

  • Any attempted purchases of pesticides by those not authorized or those without need
  • ALL security breaches if applicable
  • Suspicious activity around anhydrous ammonia storage facilities
  • Suspicious attempts to purchase fertilizer (such as ammonium nitrate, or agricultural use pesticides) by unfamiliar or suspicious persons

Producers and Auction Markets should report any of the following:

  • Suspicious behavior around farms or ranch operations
  • Theft of nurse tanks containing agricultural use pesticides or hazardous materials (Report Immediately)
  • Unusual symptoms or behavior in livestock
  • Sudden unexplained death or loss in livestock
  • Severe illness in large numbers of animals
  • Suspicious illnesses among employees

Aerial Applicators should report any tampering or attempts to purchase or rent aircraft or chemicals. 


Suspicious signs and symptoms of illnesses in employees should be reported to your local health department.  Health officials should be made aware of the emergency, normal duties and any contact with sick animals that may have led to the illness.  Details of contact with feed products, medical supplies, or chemicals that the employee may have had contact with should also be noted.


Suspicious signs and symptoms of illnesses in animals (such as blistering or ruptured blisters around the mouth, nose, teats, or hooves; central nervous system disorders that prevent the animal from rising or walking normally; loss of appetite and conditioning; swelling around the eyes and neck in poultry; dramatic drop in egg or milk production; large number of dead insects, rodents or wildlife; and unusual ticks or maggots) should be reported to your veterinarian.

If a crime is in progress, CALL 9-1-1 immediately.  If you have information about a crime, or to report suspicious activity, please contact the Federal Bureau of Investigation at (217) 522-9675.  The following information is needed: 

  • Your location
  • What activity is occurring
  • If a weapon is involved
  • Location of the activity
  • Description and license plates of any vehicles involved (make, model, color and direction of travel)
  • Description of persons (race, age, height, weight)
  • Your contact information

This information was provided by the Illinois Agro-Security Working Group.  The Illinois Agro-Security Working group is a partnership between frontline agricultural industry personnel and local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies for the purpose of preventing criminal and terrorist activities in and around Illinois agriculture and food systems.  The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Illinois Department of Agriculture, Illinois Fertilizer Chemical Association, Illinois Pork Producers, Illinois Soybean Association, Illinois Corn Growers Association, Illinois Farm Bureau, Illinois Beef Association, and the United States Department of Agriculture form the Illinois Agro-Security Working Group.

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Winnebago-Boone Farm Bureau® is affiliated with the Illinois Farm Bureau®. Illinois Farm Bureau® is a member of the
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